WOTD: Buckle

I’m not talking about what holds the ends of your belt together. You might buckle with your buckle to buckle, but that’s not very Shakespearean, is it? buckle (v.) IPA Pronunciation: grapple, fight, combat CHARLES In single combat though shalt buckle with me. – Henry VI, part 1 (IV.iv) Here, Charles the King of France […]

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Review: Shakespeare A to Z

by Charles Boyce When I’m working on one of Shakespeare’s plays there are a few books that I won’t go too far without. This is one of them. Shakespeare A to Z is a sort of encyclopedia of Shakespeare’s plays and characters, along with entries on people, places, things, stories, mythology, times, days, and more […]

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WOTD: Reguerdon

Since you have come here looking for information, I shall reguerdon you with some. reguerdon (n.) IPA Pronunciation: recompense, reward, repayment KING HENRY VI Stoop then and set your knee against my foot; And, in reguerdon of that duty done, I gird thee with the valiant sword of York – Henry VI (III.i) Also can […]

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This just in: The Glossary!

The Bard Blog is a month old today. WOW! So much has been added already and there’s a billion more things to do. I have a long list of items to write about for every category in the sidebar. If you have any suggestions for something you’d like me to discuss I’d be glad to […]

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The End?

Cutting one of Shakespeare’s plays is a common practice for obvious reasons: many of them are long. Not everyone has the patience for a three and a half hour (or more) Hamlet. Performing an uncut version of one of The Bard’s plays is in fact uncommon. But if you ever see an CUT version of […]

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WOTD: Gambol

Pronounced like what you might do at a casino, but not related. This is a popularly asked about word in Shakespeare. The meaning isn’t always obvious from the context and isn’t familiar to everyone’s eyes. This is a special post because this is a popular and versatile word. gambol IPA Pronunciation: /’gæm.bl/ (n.) leap, caper, […]

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American Shakespeare In The Shadow

When you watch a movie of a Shakespeare play, or a filmed stage version, or listen to an audiobook what do most of the actors have in common? Most are British. Now I have nothing against the UK, but a lack of good Americans doing Shakespeare in the media poses a set of problems for […]

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WOTD: Honorificabilitudinitatibus

“WHAT!?!?!?!” You ask? This is the longest word used in any of Shakespeare’s plays. It’s also the longest word in the English language that alternates consonants and vowels. Some think that it’s a meaningless word based on the context used in the play, but that’s not so! Honorificabilitudinitatibus (n.) IPA Pronunciation: the state of being […]

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WOTD: Younker

Back to a random selection, because it’s fun. younker (n.) IPA Pronunciation: 1. young man 2. greenhorn, juvenile RICHARD How well resembles it the prime of youth, Trimm’d like a younker prancing to his love! – Henry VI, Part 3 (II.i) The meaning seems to be a little derogatory. The literal meaning is #1, a […]

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Is Shakespeare Meant to be Read and Not Performed?

After quite a few mentions to this topic in the last few posts on The Shakespeare Blog – the first being For Readers’ Eyes Only – I thought I should join in on the discussion and give my three cents. Everyone is, of course, entitled to their opinion about a piece of art… but those […]

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